Fight drug cartels by voting against driver card referendum

The Bulletin
Letter: Fight drug cartels by voting against driver card referendum

By David Olen Cross /

Published Jun 29, 2014 at 12:01AM

Continuing the trend, most of the illicit drugs killing Oregonians are produced, manufactured and smuggled into the state by drug cartels operating out of Mexico.

On April 24, the Oregon Medical Examiner (OME) reported 222 drug-related deaths in 2013 caused by the illicit drugs. Of those, 123 involved methamphetamine, 111 deaths involved heroin, 12 deaths involved cocaine. Some deaths involved more than one type of drug, which is why the numbers don’t add up to the total.

Twenty-three of the state’s 36 counties had at least one death from illicit drugs in 2013.

Deschutes County had four drug-related deaths last year.

The drug deaths were evenly split between heroin and methamphetamine.

Adding up OME report numbers from 2006 to 2013, there were 1,752 illicit-drug-related deaths that occurred in the state: 213 in 2006, 212 in 2007, 229 in 2008, 213 in 2009, 200 in 2010, 240 in 2011, 223 in 2012, 222 in 2013.

Analyzing eight years of OME reports revealed there were 944 deaths from heroin, 785 deaths from methamphetamine, 293 deaths from cocaine or 268 deaths from a combination of drugs.

Moving beyond the preceding OME reports’ body counts, a look at the current Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison population gives a picture of who is most likely dealing the drugs killing the state’s residents.

On April 1 in the DOC prison system, there were 177 foreign nationals (prisoners with immigration detainers) incarcerated for drug crimes; 159 of those prisoners declared their country of origin as Mexico. That’s almost 90 percent of the foreign nationals in prison for drug crimes.

Most Oregonians are well-enough informed from news reports to know the majority of illicit drugs that originated in Mexico are injected into the state on Interstate 5, U.S. Highway 97 or Interstate 84 hidden in the bowels of cars, SUVs and trucks.

The cartels’ drug mules and dealers operating motor vehicles bringing drugs into the state or distributing drugs across the state need some form of identification, like an Oregon drivers license or drivers card, to move around the state, so they are unhindered by the possibility that a minor automobile accident or traffic citation could bring to light their criminal activities to law enforcement authorities.

Senate Bill 833, drivers card legislation passed during the 2013 Oregon state legislative session, could literally give the cartel members operating motor vehicles in this state a get-out-of-jail free card because law enforcement authorities may simply not have probable cause to search their vehicles unless a serious automobile accident or traffic violation has occurred.

One common-sense solution to reduce future drug deaths in Oregon, which is now literally a drug den of death, is to make it more difficult for Mexican drug cartel operatives to access licenses.

Oregon’s registered voters will have the opportunity in the November general election, less than five months from now, to put the brakes on Mexican drug cartels’ ability to distribute drugs in this state by voting no on Referendum 301 — thus sending Senate Bill 833’s driver cards for those who cannot prove legal presence in the United States into the archives of bad legislative history.

David Olen Cross is an immigration and foreign national crime writer. He lives in Salem.

http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/2193685-151/letter-fight-drug-cartels-by-voting-against-driver?entryType=0#

Don’t let undocumented Oregonians aid drug cartels

Statesman Journal
A GANNETT COMPANY
Don’t let undocumented Oregonians aid drug cartels

David Cross 4:07 p.m. PDT June 26, 2014

Continuing the trend, most of the illicit drugs killing Oregonians are produced, manufactured and smuggled into the state by drug cartels operating out of Mexico.

On April 24, the Oregon Medical Examiner reported that 222 deaths in 2013 were caused by illicit drugs. They included 123 deaths involving methamphetamine; 111, heroin; and 12, cocaine. Some deaths involved multiple drugs and are listed in more than one category.

Twenty-three of the state’s 36 counties had at least one death from illicit drugs. Marion County had six drug-related deaths last year — five from methamphetamine and one from heroin.

Adding up OME report numbers from 2006-2013, there were 1,752 illicit drug-related deaths: 944 deaths related to heroin; 785, methamphetamine; and 293, cocaine.

Moving beyond the body counts, a look at the current Oregon Department of Corrections prison population gives a picture of who is most likely dealing the drugs killing the state’s residents.

On April 1, there were 177 foreign nationals (prisoners with immigration detainers) incarcerated for drug crimes; 159 of those prisoners declared their country of origin being Mexico. That’s almost 90 percent of the foreign nationals in prison for drug crimes.

Most Oregonians are well enough informed from news reports to know the majority of illicit drugs that originated in Mexico are injected into the state up Interstate 5 or Highway 97 or down Interstate 84 hidden in the bowels of cars, SUVs and trucks.

The cartels’ drug mules and dealers operating vehicles bringing drugs into the state or distributing drugs across the state need some form of identification like an Oregon driver’s license or driver’s card so they are unhindered by the possibility that a minor automobile accident or traffic citation could bring to light their criminal activities.

Senate Bill 833, the driver card legislation passed during the 2013 Legislature, could literally give the cartel members operating motor vehicles in this state a get-out-of-jail-free card because law enforcement authorities may not have probable cause to search their vehicles unless a serious automobile accident or traffic violation has occurred.

One common-sense solution to reduce future drug deaths in Oregon (which is now literally a drug den of death) is to make it more difficult for Mexican drug cartel operatives to access licenses.

Oregon’s registered voters will have the opportunity in the November General Election to put the brakes on Mexican drug cartels’ ability to distribute drugs in this state by voting “no” on Referendum 301, thus sending Senate Bill 833’s driver cards for those who cannot prove legal presence in the United States into the archives of bad legislative history.

David Olen Cross of Salem writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com.

http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/opinion/2014/06/26/let-undocumented-oregonians-aid-drug-cartels/11430065/

Lars Larson Show: Criminal Alien of the Week Report

Lars Larson Show: Criminal Alien of the Week Report

June 26, 2014

Lars:

It has been an interesting last full week in the month of June when it comes to criminal aliens here in the State of Oregon.

This week we put another face to alien crime in the state for your radio listeners — criminal aliens who illegally re-enter the country.

Thursday, June 19, 2014 a West Linn Police patrol officer stopped Victor Ozuna Bernal, age 35, in Wilsonville, Oregon for an alleged traffic violation. During a computer check, the patrol officer discovered the man he had stopped had been previously deported.

A search of court records revealed that Ozuna Bernal had been convicted and sent to prison in Nebraska in 2007 for sexually abusing a 13-year-old girl. The consequences of his crime made him a criminal alien sex-offender; after completing his prison sentence he was deported to Mexico in 2012.

The officer arrested Victor Ozuna Bernal for failing to register as a sex-offender. He was taken to the Clackamas County Jail where jail officials then contacted Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents.

Apparently ICE officials have begun deportation proceedings to remove him from the country.

Sergeant Dan Kraus, the West Linn Police Public Information Officer (PIO), made the following statement about the criminal alien sex-offender’s arrest: “We don’t know how he got back into the U.S.”

Lars Larson Show listeners know one thing for sure about this criminal illegally alien invader; he didn’t walk from Mexico to West Linn, Oregon; a distance of more than 1,500 miles.

Some fast facts:

– On May 1, 2014 the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system incarcerated 1,133 criminal aliens (prisoners with immigration detainers); 207 of those alien prisoners (18.27 percent) were serving time for sex abuse;

– There were 179 Mexican nationals in the DOC prison system incarcerated for sex abuse; they accounted for 86.47 percent of the alien prison population incarcerated for sex abuse.

Lars, the last full week of June and another criminal alien report for Lars Larson Show FM 101.1 radio listeners.

docfnc

Mexican cartels have turned Oregon into a deadly drug den

East Oregonian
Mexican cartels have turned Oregon into a deadly drug den

Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 10:32 pm

By David Olen Cross | East Oregonian |

Continuing the trend, most of the illicit drugs killing Oregonians are produced, manufactured and smuggled into the state by drug cartels operating out of Mexico.

On April 24 the Oregon Medical Examiner (OME) reported 222 drug related deaths in 2013 were caused by the illicit drugs. The types of drugs by the numbers that killed 222 of the state’s residents last year were 123 deaths from methamphetamine, 111 deaths from heroin, 12 deaths from cocaine or 26 deaths from a combination of the preceding drugs.

Umatilla County had three drug related deaths last year; all the county’s drug deaths were from methamphetamine.

Adding up OME report numbers from 2006-2013 there were 1,752 illicit drug related deaths that occurred in the state:

– 2006 OME reported 213 deaths from illicit drugs; in 2007, 212 deaths; in 2008, 229 deaths; in 2009, 213 deaths; in 2010, 200 deaths; in 2011, 240 deaths; in 2012, 223 deaths; in 2013, 222 deaths from illicit drugs.

Analyzing eight years of OME reports revealed there were 944 deaths from heroin, 785 deaths from methamphetamine, 293 deaths from cocaine or 268 deaths from a combination.

Moving beyond the preceding OME reports’ body counts, a look at the current Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison population gives a picture of who is most likely dealing the drugs killing the state’s residents.

On April 1 in the DOC prison system there were 177 foreign nationals (prisoners with immigration detainers) incarcerated for drug crimes, 159 of those prisoners declared their country of origin being Mexico, almost 90 percent of the foreign nationals in prison for drug crimes.

Most Oregonians are well enough informed from news reports to know the majority of illicit drugs that originated in Mexico are injected into the state up Interstate-5, Highway-97 or down Interstate-84 hidden in the bowels of cars, SUVs and trucks.

The cartels’ drug mules and dealers operating motor vehicles bringing drugs into the state or distributing drugs across the state need some form of identification like an Oregon Divers License or Drivers Card to move around the state so they are unhindered by the possibility that a minor automobile accident or traffic citation could bring to light their criminal activities to law enforcement authorities.

Senate Bill 833, Drivers Card legislation passed during the 2013 Oregon State Legislature legislative session, could literally give the cartel members operating motor vehicles in this state a get-out-of- jail-free-card because law enforcement authorities may simply not have probable cause to search their vehicles unless a serious automobile accident or traffic violation has occurred.

One common-sense solution to reduce future drug deaths in Oregon, which is now literally a drug den of death, is to make it more difficult for Mexican cartel operatives to access licenses.

Oregon’s registered voters will have the opportunity in the 2014 November General Election, less than five months from now, to put the brakes on Mexican drug cartels’ ability to distribute drugs in this state by voting “No on Referendum 301” — thus sending Senate Bill 833’s Driver Cards for those who cannot prove legal presence in the United States into the archives of bad legislative history.

David Olen Cross writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. Email him at : docfnc@yahoo.com.

http://www.eastoregonian.com/opinion/other_views/mexican-cartels-have-turned-oregon-into-a-deadly-drug-den/article_61760486-f905-11e3-8a31-001a4bcf887a.html

Lars Larson Show: Criminal Alien of the Week Report

Lars Larson Show: Criminal Alien of the Week Report

June 19, 2014

Lars:

It has been an interesting third full week in the month of June when it comes to criminal aliens here in the State of Oregon.

This week we put another face to alien crime in the state for your radio listeners — call this report a public service announcement.

Monday, June 16th marked the seven year anniversary of the tragic untimely death of Marion County Sherriff’s Deputy Kelly James Fredinburg.

Deputy Fredinburg was killed in an automobile crash with another vehicle on June 16, 2007 while responding to a law enforcement officer needs help call on Highway 99E North of Gervais, Oregon.

The driver of the other vehicle, Alfredo De Jesus Ascencio, post accident, was charged with two counts of Criminally Negligent Homicide for causing the death of Oscar Ascencio-Amaya, his passenger, and Deputy Fredinburg.

After the accident, De Jesus Ascencio, a Mexican national, fled any possible domestic prosecution for his crimes, and is suspected by law enforcement authorities to be hiding out in the area of Puacuaro, Muichoacan, Mexico.

Over the last several weeks, as the anniversary date of Kelly Fredinburg’s death approached and passed us buy, I had a chance to talk to some of Deputy Fredinburg’s family members, his father Gary and his brother Kevin.

I gained from my conversations with Fredinburg family members, that the family needs closure in the form of bringing Alfredo De Jesus Ascencio to justice for his crimes.

In an attempt to bring De Jesus Ascencio to justice, the Fredinburg’s worked closely with law enforcement officials to establish the “Oregon Officer Reward Fund” (OORF) which has raised $20,000.00.

According to Kevin Fredinburg, at this time the current dollar amount of the reward fund has not been adequate bring forth any tips from informants in the United States or Mexico that would lead law enforcement authorities to the arrest of Alfredo De Jesus Ascencio.

Lars Larson Show listeners can help bring Marion County Sherriff’s Deputy Kelly James Fredinburg’s killer to justice by going to OORF website and making a contribution (website www.oorf.info).

Some fast facts:

Oregon Officer Reward Fund website:

http://www.oregonofficersrewardfund.com/

Marion County Sheriff’s Office website:

http://www.co.marion.or.us/SO/EnforcementDivision/kellyfredinburg.htm

Lars, the third full week of June and another criminal alien report for Lars Larson Show FM 101.1 radio listeners.

docfnc

Driver cards will aid drug smugglers

OregonLive.com
Driver cards will aid drug smugglers: Guest opinion

By Guest Columnist Follow on Twitter on June 18, 2014 at 11:39 AM, updated June 18, 2014 at 11:40 AM

By David Olen Cross

Continuing the trend, much of the illicit drugs killing Oregonians are produced, manufactured and smuggled into the state by drug cartels operating out of Mexico.

On April 24, the Oregon Medical Examiner (OME) reported 222 drug related deaths in 2013 were caused by the illicit drugs. The types of drugs by the numbers that killed 222 of the state’s residents last year were 123 deaths from methamphetamine, 111 deaths from heroin, 12 deaths from cocaine or 26 deaths from a combination of the preceding drugs.

When it came to illicit drug related deaths in the state last year, according to the OME, Multnomah County had the dubious distinction of leading all 36 Oregon counties with 102 drug related deaths (65 heroin, 45 methamphetamine, nine cocaine or 18 from a combination of drugs).

Putting these numbers into perspective, Multnomah County residents are just over 19 percent of Oregon’s population of 3.9 million, yet the county experienced nearly 46 percent of the state’s illicit drug deaths.

Not only last year, but over the last eight years Multnomah has led all Oregon counties in OME reported illicit drug related deaths by number and percentage:

– 2006 Multnomah 95 illicit drug deaths (45 percent of state’s drug deaths);
– 2007 Multnomah 101 illicit drug deaths (48 percent of state’s drug deaths);
– 2008 Multnomah 106 illicit drug deaths (46 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2009 Multnomah 94 illicit drug deaths (44 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2010 Multnomah 87 illicit drug deaths (43 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2011 Multnomah 119 illicit drug deaths (50 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2012 Multnomah 103 illicit drug deaths (46 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2013 Multnomah 102 illicit drug deaths (46 percent state’s drug deaths).

Totaling the preceding numbers from eight years of OME reports, Multnomah County had 807 of the 1,752 illicit drug related deaths recorded in the state; an average of 46 percent of the state’s drug deaths.

Moving beyond the preceding OME reports’ body counts, a look at the current Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison population gives a picture of who is most likely dealing the drugs killing the state’s residents.

On April 1 in the DOC prison system there were 177 foreign nationals (prisoners with immigration detainers) incarcerated for drug crimes. One hundred fifty nine of those prisoners declared their country of origin is Mexico. That’s almost 90 percent of the foreign nationals in prison for drug crimes.

Locally, cases adjudicated in Multnomah County Circuit Courts have sent 58 Mexican nationals to serve time in DOC prisons for drug crimes, over 36 percent of the Mexicans in the state convicted and sent to prison for drug crimes.

Most Oregonians are well enough informed from news reports to know the majority of illicit drugs entering the state that originated in Mexico are driven up Interstate-5 hidden in the bowels of cars, SUVs and trucks.

The cartels’ drug mules and dealers operating motor vehicles bringing drugs into the state or distributing drugs across the state need some form of identification like an Oregon driver’s license or driver card to move around the state so they are unhindered by the possibility that a minor automobile accident or traffic citation could bring to light their criminal activities to law enforcement authorities.

Senate Bill 833, driver card legislation passed during the 2013 legislative session, could literally give the cartel members operating motor vehicles in this state a get-out-of-jail-free card because law enforcement authorities may simply not have probable cause to search their vehicles unless a serious automobile accident or traffic violation has occurred.

One common-sense solution to reduce future drug deaths in Oregon, case in point Multnomah County, which is now literally a drug den of death, is to make it more difficult for Mexican drug cartel operatives to access licenses.

Oregon’s registered voters will have the opportunity in the 2014 November general election, less than five months from now, to put the brakes on Mexican drug cartels’ ability to distribute drugs in this state by voting “No” on referendum 301 — thus sending Senate Bill 833’s driver cards for those who cannot prove legal presence in the United States into the archives of bad legislative history.

David Olen Cross lives in Salem. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com.

http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2014/06/driver_cards_will_aid_drug_smu.html
 

Mexican Cartels Make Multnomah County a Drug Den of Death

THE LARS LARSON SHOW
Mexican Cartels Make Multnomah County a Drug Den of Death

Posted on:Jun 12 2014

By David Olen Cross

Continuing the trend, most of the illicit drugs killing Oregonians are produced, manufactured and smuggled into the state by drug cartels operating out of Mexico.

On April 24th the Oregon Medical Examiner (OME) reported 222 deaths in 2013 were caused by the illicit drugs. The types of drugs by the numbers that killed 222 of the state’s residents last year were 123 from methamphetamine, 111 from heroin, 12 from cocaine or 26 from a combination of the preceding drugs.

When it came to illicit drug related deaths in the state last year, according to the OME, Multnomah County had the dubious distinction of leading all 36 Oregon counties with 102 drug related deaths (65 heroin, 45 methamphetamine, 9 cocaine or 18 from a combination of drugs).

Putting these numbers into perspective, Multnomah County residents are approximately 19.49 percent of Oregon’s population of 3.93 million, yet the county experienced 45.94 percent of the state’s illicit drug deaths.

Not only last year, but over the last eight years Multnomah has led all Oregon counties in OME reported illicit drug related deaths by number and percentage:

– 2006 Multnomah 95 illicit drug deaths (44.60 percent of state’s drug deaths);
– 2007 Multnomah 101 illicit drug deaths (47.64 percent of state’s drug deaths);
– 2008 Multnomah 106 illicit drug deaths (46.28 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2009 Multnomah 94 illicit drug deaths (44.13 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2010 Multnomah 87 illicit drug deaths (43.50 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2011 Multnomah 119 illicit drug deaths (49.58 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2012 Multnomah 103 illicit drug deaths (46 13 percent state’s drug deaths);
– 2013 Multnomah 102 illicit drug deaths (45.94 percent state’s drug deaths).

Totaling the preceding numbers from eight years of OME reports, Multnomah County had 807 of the 1,752 illicit drug related deaths recorded in the state; an average of 46.06 percent of the state’s drug deaths.

Moving beyond the preceding OME reports’ body counts, a look at the current Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison population gives a picture of who is most likely dealing the drugs killing the state’s residents.

On April 1st in the DOC prison system there were 177 foreign nationals (prisoners with immigration detainers) incarcerated for drug crimes, 159 of those prisoners declared their country of origin being Mexico, that’s 89.83 percent of the foreign nationals in prison for drug crimes.

Locally, cases adjudicated in Multnomah County Circuit Courts have sent 58 Mexican nationals to serve time in DOC prisons for drug crimes, 36.48 percent of the Mexicans in the state convicted and sent to prison for drug crimes.

Most Oregonians are well enough informed from news reports to know the majority of illicit drugs entering the state that originated in Mexico are driven up Interstate-5 hidden in the bowels of cars, SUVs and trucks.

The cartels’ drug mules and dealers operating motor vehicles bringing drugs into the state or distributing drugs across the state need some form of identification like an Oregon Divers License or Drivers Card to move around the state so they are unhindered by the possibility that a minor automobile accident or traffic citation could bring to light their criminal activities to law enforcement authorities.

Senate Bill 833, Drivers Card legislation passed during the 2013 Oregon State Legislature legislative session, could literally give the cartel members operating motor vehicles in this state a get-out-of- jail-free-card because law enforcement authorities may simply not have probable cause to search their vehicles unless a serious automobile accident or traffic violation has occurred.

One common-sense solution to reduce future drug deaths in Oregon, case in point Multnomah County, which is now literally a drug den of death, is to make it more difficult for Mexican drug cartel operatives to access licenses.

Oregon’s registered voters will have the opportunity in the 2014 November General Election, less than five months from now, to put the brakes on Mexican drug cartels’ ability to distribute drugs in this state by voting “No on Referendum 301” — thus sending Senate Bill 833’s Driver Cards for those who cannot prove legal presence in the United States into the archives of bad legislative history.

David Olen Cross of Salem writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at https://docfnc.wordpress.com/.

http://larslarson.com/mexican-cartels-make-multnomah-county-a-drug-den-of-death/